Another Bank Consortium? Paydiant

Banks have not put all of their eggs in the TCH basket. There is another Bank Consortium around payments which I have not discussed: Paydiant has been working with 27 odd banks around a “Push Payments” pilot for last 2 yrs.

PUSH Payments – 27 Bank ‘Consortium’

Summary

  • Banks have another “consortium” on payments I have not discussed: Paydiant Push Payments
  • Trials have been underway for over 2 years
  • Competes with TCH tokens
  • Led by BAC, FIS, and other top banks
  • Objective: minimize changes to POS, through a new payment terminal which displays QR code.
  • Flow: Customer takes picture of Payment Terminal QR Code (which contains MID and TID), Code sent from Consumer Phone to FIS service, translated in to card (currently), Processed in normal Auth flow, then Auth PUSHED to POS terminal.
  • Elavon in primary processor for TCH tokens, FIS is focused on Paydiantpaydient

Background

On a flight to SFO today and I’m looking at 50 odd emails from last week questioning my blog on Host Card Emulation (HCE). It has certainly caused a stir with the NFC community. As most know, companies like SimplyTap have been able to make this work on the Blackberry platform for some time…. I don’t mention vendors by mistake… but can’t tell you much more here other than it would be worth your time to work with them if you want to evaluate HCE.

How does HCE play in a world of Tokens, QR codes, merchant run networks, NFC, and Push payments? Well quite frankly nothing is happening now, and until a critical mass of Banks, retailers and platforms start to deliver value (beyond payment) nothing will.  I’ve stated many times that existing networks are ill equipped to drive fundamental change. For example banks look at mobile as a chance to cement use of credit card and maintain control over payments (and consumers).

Those that have read my numerous Token articles know that Banks have been working to disintermediate Visa/Mastercard. The theme is “if there is a number stored on the mobile phone, we want that number to be one we own and control.. not a V/MA number.. but ours”. This number is the Token I referred to in Tokens – Volunteer Needed, Directory Battle, and Tokens and Networks,  …etc. Last month Visa, MA and Amex launched their own competing token scheme to ensure Issuers did not end run them. This has put significant dampers on the TCH project, together with the loss of its early bank champions (Paul Gallant now CEO of Verifone).  The TCH project is likely to morph into ACH and perhaps debit tokens, as well as coordinator of standards, with the Card Network consortium winning the battle over Card tokenization. The only significant piece of new information on this is that the TCH bank champions were emphatic that Regulators would FORCE TOKENs in pending rules. Lets see if that happens.

PUSH PAYMENTS

Banks have not put all of their eggs in the TCH basket. There is another Bank Consortium around payments which I have not discussed: PAYDIANT (http://www.paydiant.com/). Paydiant has been working with 27 odd banks around a “Push Payments” pilot (see blog for Push discussion).

Paydiant Flow

  • Merchant has specialized Payment Terminal that can generate a Paydiant QR Code. No POS change necessary
  • Consumer has Paydiant application or Bank white labeled version
  1. Merchant pushes normal card button on ECR
  2. ECR sends Payment amount to FIS Card Reader
  3. FIS Reader Generates Unique QR code based upon Amount, Merchant ID (MID), Terminal ID (TID)
  4. Consumer launches application and takes a picture of the QR Code
  5. Application sends QR code to FIS/Processor for transalation and asks consumer to confirm amount/payment instrument selection
  6. Consumer confirms transaction
  7. FIS sends transaction through normal payment Auth flow.
  8. FIS receives Auth
  9. FIS Sends Auth to pending MID/TID
  10. Merhant Payment Terminal receives Authorization and communicates to ECR
  11. Transaction is completed

I think of this as a reverse Starbucks. Consumer reads a QR code instead of the other way around. In a perfect world this is a great example of push payments. Only supporting issuers can participate, and they can set rules for interchange, fraud or anything else they want to with Merchant. Banks can also completely circumvent Visa and Mastercard as actual card number did not have to be used.

This solution, while very attractive, does have a few problems. In my own personal experience

#1 Connectivity. Over half of participating merchants had to install wi-fi hot spots as consumers did not have data connectivity in stores. This makes for a very bad (and slow) consumer experience.

#2 Glare. I couldn’t take picture of the terminal without holding another hand up to block glare. Of course we could solve this with Bluetooth LE, or some other factor.. but today it is a problem.

#3 Learning curve. Taking a picture of a QR code is not something most of us do..  Cashiers are not in a place to help

#4 Why? This entire solution is cool.. but why? It is MUCH EASIER to just pay with my card. Just as in Card Linked Offers, there are very few advertisers or other offer content to make this attractive.  FIS seeks to offer LevelUp like loyalty services, but currently in its infancy.

Bank Chaos

The reason I’m telling this story is  to show you the chaos going around mobile payments. Just because the technology works doesn’t make this a great idea. However, I do like this particular initiative very much, as it is the BEGINNING of a new network and a NEW APPROACH to payments that could reinforce Bank roles in authentication.  The flow makes sense to me.. we just have a few problems with the phone to Payment Terminal interface.  Imagine if I could couple this with a SQUARE voice experience and Apple’s new fingerprint technology.

Paydiant was quite sure they were going to win the MCX business. The solution’s complete dependence on processors and issuers made this quite unattractive, and hence Gemalo’s win (see blog).

I have a number of friends in the payment s industry, and each bank seems to be involved in multiple intitiatives:

  1. Tokens
  2. CLOs
  3. NFC
  4. Paydiant
  5. Apple/Google Wallets
  6. MCX
  7. EMV/Reissuance
  8. Visa/MA/Amex Scheme
  9. …etc

It is a crazy time. Small companies and mobile investors need to be aware of this Chaos, and understand the diffusion of focus.

Private Label.. “New” Competitive Environment?

Clearly there are opportunities for new retailer friendly networks. The new incremental value TO BE delivered is centered around influencing and rewarding the (consumer in partnership with merchants). Given that retailers compete with each other, loyalty is thus useless for retailers which don’t offer competitive products at competitive rates. Thus a “community” of retailers is not as valuable as a “community” of consumers (ie Facebook, Twitter, Android, Apple). Thus platforms which serve the community of consumers will be much more effective.

1 April 2012 (sorry for typos, 2 hour quick blog here…you get what you pay for)

Updated

Remember the BIGGEST Retailer challenge is to know WHO THE CUSTOMER IS. A PL card combines loyalty card + customer information + payment information (closed loop) + possible payment information open loop. What Retailers gained by giving up their PL cards was access to credit without credit risk.. what they lost was the ability to know who the customer was. We now have models where they can have their cake and eat it too.

Most Retailers spend very little of their own money on marketing… it is the manufacturer that provides credits in form of “trade spend” to help Retailers advertise. Retailers thus seek new innovative tools to channel this spend. It is an arms race as retailers work to compete in selling commodity goods at the highest possible prices. A Retailer that has a new fun way to engage the customer will have a quantitative edge… and attract greater trade spend if they can engage customer. Manufactures want brand loyalty, Retailers want retailer loyalty, Platforms want platform loyalty, Banks want Card Loyalty. Best case study by far is Target Redcard (read great Mercator Report) which now accounts for 6%+ of sales (debit) from nothing just 2 years ago “net cost of offers”.  To restate above, with respect to Retailer “marketing spend” it is not the Retailer’s money.. it is the manufacturers. Few people understand this game.. which is why most Retailers laugh at silicon valley types with no retail background. The macro effect of new payment networks will be to shift AD spend from less efficient channels (TV, Radio, …) to more effective channels (?Trade spend). The money does NOT come from the Retailer.. but enables the RETAILER TO BE A BETTER MARKETER by using their data.

What is the business driver of the JPM deal?

If you were a bank which had all of the technical assets to run a 3 party network, but were constrained by rules in which your assets operated.. what would you do?Interchange Rates US Fed

Institutional investors constantly tell me that the Visa is efficient and that the overall network “costs” are very small in proportion to the benefits of universal acceptance.  Well there are very big assumptions in this statement of efficiency….

  1. That all parties are benefiting from universal acceptance
  2. There are no competitors operating in a different model

Both of these assumptions are wrong. If we look at it from a macro view, a 2% tax on sales is not very “efficient” at all, particularly when combined with a 15-20% interest rate on ANR of a typical card. The “value” of credit cards is highly biased toward banks and affluent customers.  As the Fed Study below illustrates, Affluent customers receive a benefit of $1,133 from consumers that pay with cash.

Card Rewards US Federal Reserve

Reward levels and retail prices affect the welfare of each individual  consumer differently. Although typical U.S. consumers use payment cards as well as cash and checks, some consumers use payment cards  more exclusively, while others use cash or checks more exclusively. If  more generous rewards imply higher prices for all consumers regardless  of their payment methods, then they may make consumers who tend  to use cash and checks worse off.

Who Loses in from Credit Card Payments? Federal Reserve Bank of Boston

Merchant fees and reward programs generate an implicit monetary transfer to credit card  users from non-card (or “cash”) users because merchants generally do not set differential  prices for card users to recoup the costs of fees and rewards. On average, each cash-using  household pays $149 to card-using households and each card-using household receives $1,133 from cash users every year.

The very nature of card are changing, a disruption based on mobile ($0 issuance cost, improved identification/fraud) and data/advertising (see GoogleWallet).

How would you design the OPTIMAL Merchant friendly payment network?

Features

  • Merchant Brand – Merchant’s brand
  • Cost of Payment – $0.05 for Debit
  • Risk Management – Allow for use of merchant data, mobile data and bank data.
  • Enable Merchant CRM – See blog
  • Consumer Credit – Available. Banks compete for lowest rate.
  • Payment Processing/Acceptance. Accepted in merchant, can be used off network as well. Minimal changes to existing systems
  • Consumer Support Services – Dispute resolution
  • Mobile Services
    1. Product Selection – Buying guide/research
    2. Community – Reviews
    3. Social – Facebook/Twitter integration
    4. Loyalty Services – Support merchant loyalty programs, points, incentives
    5. Advertising Services – Touch customer prior to purchase, during shopping, at checkout
    6. Coupon/redemption services – Enable all incentives to be stored/presented/managed
    7. eReciept – Supports customer requirements

This is certainly much beyond what Visa is currently delivering. As I’ve stated previously, Google and American Express are by far the leaders here, as top 5 banks struggle to deliver these services within a 4 party network.

The private label card industry is hot (See December American Banker, Mercator on Target RedCard). JPM is now uniquely positioned to deliver a platform which can support multiple private label payment products… from MCX to Google.  It would seem that their unique Visa relationship allows them to benefit from Visa’s larger  acceptance network when their private label card operates beyond a “closed loop” merchant community. An open question is whether a given private label merchant will choose to have a Visa bug on their card or not, and if the bug is not on the card.. will it still operate as a visa card?  This seems to be the only reason for a “switch” of transaction from VisaNet to JPM VisaNet.. so it seems to be a planned feature.  Regardless of approach on Bug and Switching transactions, JPM is in a class by itself in competing for business of merchants, payment platforms, and delivering value around Visa.JPM PL Example

In the mobile world the cost of issuance is now $0.. why wouldn’t every merchant want their own private label card? With a punch list of available features above? Giving every merchant “Cluster” the ability to strike agreements with other clusters (example Wal-mart accepting Exxon cards, see blog). Merchants that currently give their consumers loyalty cards, could exchange them for multi function virtual cards in a mobile wallet at no cost. Target is the clear leader here.

My view is that banks tend to look at private label as a division of their Card’s group. Banks have no other way to monetize the card platform beyond fees and rates.  The winner here will look at these new private label initiatives, not as a payments initiative, but rather as CRM and advertising. A very challenging task that goes against both organization, and consumer behavior. During my time running 2 of the world’s largest online banks, consumers don’t spend time shopping for deals. In retail banking they log on, check their balance, pay their bills 2-3 times a week. In Card it is much worse, coming on 2-3 times per MONTH.

Clearly there are opportunities for new retailer friendly networks. The new incremental value TO BE delivered is centered around influencing and rewarding the (consumer in partnership with merchants). Given that retailers compete with each other, loyalty is thus useless for retailers which don’t offer competitive products at competitive rates. Thus a “community” of retailers is not as valuable as a “community” of consumers (ie Facebook, Twitter, Android, Apple). Thus platforms which serve the community of consumers will be much more effective. Banks seem ill suited to “drive” this new network as they have demonstrated a very poor history of “partnership” with retailers.  For example current CLO initiatives are focused on using retailer data against them (Blog). We thus see banks working on a defensive token strategy to ensure that no one can operate on payment rails but them.ven goog reach

Future Scenarios for POS Payments

  1. Private Label Bank Platform. Amex in lead, JPM #2. Keys for success: delivering value beyond affluent, reaching consumer before they buy, delivering merchant CRM, helping merchants “own” the consumer.
  2. Retailer led payments. Target is role model, blog here. As Mercator reports, RedCard now accounts for 8% of sales.
  3. Retailer led financial services. Either through Pre-Paid as in the Amex/WMT relationship, or as in Tesco’s bank. Retailers (or MNOs) leveraging their physical distribution and foot traffic to deliver bank services. Keys for success: expanding beyond the Mass to the Affluent, consumer value proposition, consumer acquisition, bank licenses/regulatory, CRM, Advertising
  4. Neutral Party Platform. Square, Google, Level Up, ?Apple, ?Amazon… Consumer friendly… the means getting both merchants and banks on board.  Overview in blog on TXVIA, and Digital Wallet Strategies.

None of these will be successful in isolation.. my bet is that we will continue to see complete chaos until we find parties that can partner… or gain traction in a segment of the market that is not in view of 800lb Gorilla’s. Retailers, banks all view the customer as uniquely theirs. Once these entities realize that consumers migrate toward value and entertainment, they will begin to align their services to channels where consumers reside.. NOT to where they WANT their consumers to reside. (I’m not looking for diaper coupons on bankofamerica.com). Similarly, Private label cards are a key element of a broader CRM and price promotion strategy… they do not exist in isolation and cannot be outsourced in part. price promotion

My top example this month is Restaurants. There are over 800,000 restaurant locations in the US. 474,000 of them are part of companies with less than 500 employees (independents).  This is a perfect ground for Square, Fisbowl (CRM) and LevelUp (Payments).. Square gives them a cash register that integrates existing card payments at a significantly lower cost on day one, and there is new functionality for advertising and buying experience (pay with Square).

Thoughts appreciated.

Retailers Discourage Credit Cards

I maintain that Banks have the facilities to win in payments (see blog).. but winning is more than leveraging your user base and ubiquity to extract tolls from merchants.. and more about delivering value.

9 July 2012

WSJ Article Today: Price of Plastic Going Up?

Merchants may soon begin to impose a surcharge each time a customer pays with credit card, a practice Visa Inc. and MasterCard Inc. currently prohibit…. [But provision will likely go away as part of impending settlement].

The “accept all cards” rule is likely to undergo a huge change, with implications for Visa/MA earnings, new retailer led payment networks, mobile wallets, issuer loyalty programs, EMV reissue, and “new products” (ex. Instant credit, pre-paid, decoupled debit, …).

Take a look at this excellent GAO Report to gain detailed insight into the battle being fought.

 Several of the large merchants that we interviewed attributed their rising card acceptance costs to customers’ increased use of rewards cards. Staff from these merchants all expressed concerns that the increasing use of rewards cards was increasing merchants’ costs without providing commensurate benefits. For example, one large merchant provided us with data on its overall sales and its card acceptance costs. Our analysis of these data indicated that from 2005 to June 2009, this merchant’s sales had increased 23 percent, but its card acceptance costs rose 31 percent. Rewards cards were presented as payment for less than 1 percent of its total sales volume in 2005 but accounted for almost 28 percent of its sales volume by June 2009.

This will have an impact on Visa’s volumes if card issuers don’t start immediately renegotiating the rates with the top retailers. This taken together with Durbin (see previous blog), retailer driven payment networks (ex See Target RedCard), Retailers acting as banks (see GDot/WMT), Google/PayPal at POS (as MSBs), Pre-paid cards, …etc. We have a VERY exciting time in payments that the banks will be challenged in responding to.

Why will this impact Visa’s US volumes? Well if signature debit it dead, consumers will use PIN debit (just like Canada and Australia). In the Post Durbin world, Retailers don’t have to route PIN debit transactions through Visa at all. If retailers aggressively reprice credit card transactions (adding fee of 1-2%) we will have consumers shift spend back to debit.. a PIN debit… This also is happening at a time when consumers aren’t exactly fond of banks and fees. If the top 20 US retailers add fee to credit card use, this could impact Visa’s growth buy 2-6% in 2 years. The main dependencies here are Issuer’s ability to lower interchange for these retailers and survival of Signature debit (over bank controlled PIN Debit).

Certain merchants obviously benefit from access to ubiquitous consumer credit facilities, and these merchants are unlikely to add on any fee. But retailers in non-discretionary and low margin segments will likely move aggressively to stem the growth of loyalty driven credit card use. I would also expect retailers to add lower cost payment options, instant credit (ex paypal’s BillMeLater) and new products which may replace some of the “lost” loyalty benefits (ex Target RedCard).

I maintain that Banks have the facilities to win in payments (see blog).. but winning is more than leveraging your user base and ubiquity to extract tolls from merchants.. and more about delivering value. Unfortunately Banks are working to restrict growth of new payment mechanisms by enhancing control points (ie ACH) .. they have seen this coming and are looking to lock any door they can. If you lock the door.. someone will just jump through the window.

BIG winners if there is a settlement on passing credit card costs:

  1. Payment service providers not dependent on credit, or offering alternative PayPal, Google, Square,
  2. Instant Credit
  3. Retailer Led payment networks
  4.  Pre-paid,
  5. PIN Debit

Loosers:

  1. Anyone dependent on a credit card (NFC, issuers, loyalty, …).

For my mobile friends.. this may give you additional context on why many merchants don’t accept NFC?